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Daylighting Multipliers - Increasing Daylight Harvesting Efficiency

Description:

This session will explore the role that daylighting multipliers are used when trying to increase the efficiency of daylighting or daylight harvesting in a building, such as, light shelves, manufactured glazing, and material specification. Furthermore, we will explore the rate of return, the ranges of efficiency, and appropriate uses between daylighting strategies and multipliers.

Learning Objective 1: 
Participants will learn the differences between daylighting strategies and daylight harvesting as it relates to IECC 2012, IECC 2015, and LEED V4.
Learning Objective 2: 
Participants will learn the appropriate uses for daylighting multipliers, such as, light shelves, manufactured glazing, material specification, and secondary daylight strategies as it relates to the context of the built environment.
Learning Objective 3: 
Participants will learn the appropriate uses for daylighting multipliers, such as, light shelves, manufactured glazing, material specification, and secondary daylight strategies for increasing efficiency of uniform illumination and the annual kWh load.
Learning Objective 4: 
Participants will have an understanding that not all strategies that are implemented will have a full range of desired efficiency or uniform illumination, but rather, a layering of daylight strategies and multipliers is required to achieve these goals.
Learning Units: 
1 LU
Course Status: 
Approved
AIA Course Number: 
IDL202002
Speaker: 

Dylan Agnes
Research Scientist I
Biography: 
After earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Architecture from the University of Idaho, Moscow, Dylan studied the science and engineering of building design by completing a Master's degree in architecture. As a student he worked at the Integrated Design Lab and gained hands-on experience in the practice of Integrated Design. As an IDL Research assistant, Dylan worked with both the architectural and engineering side of integrated design, providing a broader opportunity to cross over fields of study. He started working on real world projects at the Lab in the spring of 2015 and, graduated with a Master's of Architecture in Fall of 2017 with an emphasis in urban planning and net-zero/energy efficiency building design. Shortly after graduation Dylan began working as a Research Assistant at the IDL and has since been working on a wide range of projects from Energy Modeling to Daylighting Design.